English-speaking jobs in Germany

When moving to Germany, many people want to get a job as soon as possible. The fastest way to get one is to apply for English-speaking jobs in Germany when you cannot speak German on a basic level. Tideri will help you to find job opportunities from various Online Job Boards and list them for you here. So you can focus on your career and on applying, while spending a lot of time for searching English-speaking jobs.

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IT architect for provider management
Deutsche Bundesbank
Germany
Part-timePermanent
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Support Engineer - Technical Training & Support
Broadsign
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Senior architect engineer, senior cloud architect, senior cloud engineer
Optimus Search
Germany
Full-timeRemotePermanent
New
Logistics staff (m/f/d)
Amazon
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
IT Portfolio Manager (m/f/d)
BIRKENSTOCK GROUP B.V. & CO. KG
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Embedded Software Engineer (m/f/d) BMC
Delta Energy Systems (Germany) GmbH
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
SAP Project Consultant
Cavendish Professionals
Germany
Full-timePermanent
Purchasing - Buyer Full Time | Dover Downs - Dover, DE, 19901 chevron_right
Dover Downs
Germany
Full-timePermanent
Business Development Manager (m/f/d) Water Industry
KAESER KOMPRESSOREN SE
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Mitarbeiter (m/w/d) IT Service Desk / IT Support
EURASIA STATINVEST GmbH
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Financial Controller (German & English speaking)
zvoove
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Support Consultant SAP (m/w/d)
NGP - SAP & Salesforce Experts
Germany
Full-timeRemotePermanent
New
Mulesoft Developer (m/w/x)
TECHOHANA
Germany
Full-timeRemotePermanent
Project Scheduler (m/w/d)
Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. German Branch
Germany
Full-timePermanent
New
Senior Technical Solution Expert
Sparkion | A Vontier company; part of EVolveTM e-mobility portfolio
Germany
Full-timePermanent
Table of contents

Is it possible to find a Job in Germany as an English speaker?

It is absolutely possible to find an English-speaking Job in Germany, but not every industry is equally well-suited. This is why we want to take a closer look at the following article and give you some information on what to think about and where to start looking, if you want to start a career in Germany

Who can make a career with English skills in Germany?

If you are looking to have a career in Germany using your English skills, that is absolutely possible. How big of a career you will have will depend on what other skills you have to offer besides speaking English

There are some Entry-level Jobs in Germany, where you don’t necessarily have to be able to speak German. However, in these jobs it is also more difficult to move up and earn more money. For people who want to work in Germany and have no special skills, they are a good starting point. If you want to develop your skills, you will have the opportunity to further your education in order to climb the career ladder. 

But there are also some jobs in which you can earn good money directly if you have the appropriate skills. These include for example, jobs in the IT industry but also in large companies. Especially in Berlin and other large cities, there are many English-speaking jobs and opportunities for foreigners to gain a foothold.

No visa needed – If you are an EU-citizen or Citizen of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland, you are not required to get a work visa for Germany. Citizens of EU and EEA countries (including Switzerland) have the right to work in Germany without a visa or work permit. They can freely enter and stay in Germany for employment purposes.

What salary can you expect as an English speaker?

The salary you can expect as an English speaker in Germany will depend on several factors, including your qualifications, experience, industry, job role, and the region where you are working. Germany has a strong economy with a well-developed labor market, and salaries generally reflect that. 

It’s challenging to provide specific salary figures without knowing the industry and job role you are considering. However, as a reference point, the average gross monthly salary in Germany across all industries was around €3,994 in 2021, according to the Federal Statistical Office of Germany. But it’s important to note that this figure includes all professions and sectors, and individual salaries can vary significantly. Also, salaries vary around the different states in Germany in the east workers generally still get paid less than in the west. 

What are entry opportunities for English speakers in Germany?

There are several entry opportunities for English speakers in Germany, especially in industries and roles that have a high demand for English proficiency.

Here are some common options:

  1. Language Teaching
  2. Tourism and Hospitality
  3. Customer Service and Support
  4. Startups and Tech Companies
  5. Internships and Trainee Programs
  6. Freelancing and Remote Work

It’s worth noting that for some of these entry-level opportunities, proficiency in the German language may not be an essential requirement. However, learning German or improving your language skills will enhance your overall employability and open up additional job prospects.

5 Tips on how to find an English-speaking job in Germany

Finding a job in a foreign country can be a difficult task, so we want to provide you with some tips on where to start looking for a job. 

Where to search for jobs: 

Utilize online job portals, professional networks, and career websites specific to Germany. Popular job search platforms in Germany include LinkedIn, Xing, Tideri, Indeed, and StepStone. These platforms often have filters to search for English-speaking jobs or specify language requirements in job postings.

Jobs at start-ups and big companies: 

Explore opportunities at start-ups and large multinational companies operating in Germany. Start-ups, particularly in cities like Berlin, Frankfurt, and Hamburg often have a more international and English-friendly environment. Similarly, many big companies with an international presence conduct their business in English and hire English-speaking professionals.

Search for jobs in big cities: 

Concentrate your job search in major German cities, where there is a higher likelihood of finding English-speaking positions. Cities like Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt, and Hamburg have vibrant job markets and a greater demand for English-speaking talent due to their international nature and diverse industries.

Get a job in a digital department: 

Digital departments, such as digital marketing, e-commerce, web development, and software engineering, often require English-speaking professionals due to the global nature of the field. Develop your skills in these areas and target companies with digital departments that have an English-speaking work environment.

Follow German standards while applying: 

When applying for jobs in Germany, it’s important to adhere to German standards and expectations. Tailor your application documents, including your CV and cover letter, to the German style. Research the specific requirements for each application and consider including a professional photo, highlighting your relevant skills and qualifications, and using a formal tone. Additionally, be prepared for interviews and familiarize yourself with common German interview practices.

Who needs a work visa? If you are a citizen of a country outside the EU/EEA, you will typically need a work visa or residence permit to legally work in Germany. However, there are some exceptions based on specific agreements or programs. It’s essential to check the requirements specific to your country of citizenship. Non-EU/EEA citizens can apply for a seasonal work visa if they have a job offer for seasonal employment in specific sectors like agriculture or tourism. 

How to prepare, after finding a job in Germany 

Once you have secured a job, you can take several important steps to prepare for your new professional journey in the country. Here are some key considerations:

  1. Visa and Work Permit: Determine if you require a visa or work permit to work in Germany legally. Depending on your citizenship and the nature of your employment, you may need to apply for a work visa or residence permit. Research the requirements and begin the application process well in advance to ensure a smooth transition. Find out, if you fulfill the requirements for the blue card EU. If so, you will benefit from many advantages. 
  2. Cultural Adaptation: Familiarize yourself with German culture, customs, and workplace norms. Take the time to understand the work culture in your new company, such as expected office hours, communication styles, and business etiquette. Being sensitive to cultural differences and adapting to local practices will help you integrate into the workplace and build stronger professional relationships.
  3. Financial Planning: Understand the financial aspects of working in Germany. Research taxation regulations, healthcare and insurance requirements, and set up a German bank account to manage your finances efficiently. Consider consulting with a financial advisor or doing thorough research to ensure you comply with local regulations and make informed decisions.

Are there ways to improve my English skills or learn German to increase my chances in the job market in German cities?

While you may have secured a job as an English speaker, investing time and effort in learning German will greatly benefit your daily life and work experience in Germany. Consider enrolling in language courses or using language learning resources to improve your German skills and facilitate better communication and integration. If you got an entry-level job, with only basic English skills, improving your English will help as well to be able to communicate better and improve your chances on the job market. 

Yes, there are recruitment agencies in Germany that specialize in placing English-speaking professionals in various industries. These agencies have extensive networks and can help match your skills and qualifications with relevant job opportunities. Another option would be Career Coaching Services and Networking Events and Expat Communities. 

When seeking assistance from consulting services or agencies, be sure to research their reputation, check client reviews and testimonials, and clarify any fees or charges involved. Additionally, don’t hesitate to leverage the expertise and networks of local contacts, colleagues, and mentors who can provide insights and recommendations related to job search resources and services.

Blue card EU – For people with education in high-demand jobs like doctors, engineers, but also for natural scientists, mathematicians and IT specialists you have the possibility to earn a blue card EU. It is a special work visa, with an easier application process. Although, your salary will have to be at least 45.552 Euro yearly to be considered for it. 

Conclusion

Finding an English-speaking job in Germany is possible as long as you are looking in the right places. But make sure you are getting the right visa and check if you qualify for the blue card EU, to profit from an easier visa process. Tideri is here for you, if you need help finding the right English-speaking job in Germany from an online job board. We are using your search request to find fitting jobs from various websites. You can scroll through the results and choose the best offers for English-speaking jobs instead of searching all sites by yourself. 

FAQ

Are there English-speaking jobs in Germany?

Yes, even though the German job market is dominated by jobs, where you need to speak German, there are also opportunities for English speakers. Especially in big cities, Start-ups and digital Departments of big companies, you have a chance to find English-speaking jobs. Some jobs still require having some German skill though, so you have to read the requirements in the job ad carefully.

Should I learn German, even though I have an English-speaking job?

There are true English-speaking jobs, where you don’t need any German skills. But those are rare and learning German will help you to have more opportunities and also to talk to more of your colleagues. Besides, you need to navigate life outside of work as well, and learning at least some basic German will help with that. 

What visa do I need to work in Germany?

If and what kind of visa you need, depends on where you are from. EU-citizens don’t need a work permit to move and work in another EU-country. Most Citizens from non-member countries will have to apply for a visa to stay and work in Germany. You should therefore first find out what is required for the issuance of a work visa.